Agnes Howard

Today’s parents often let their children off the hook when it comes to household chores, but Agnes Howard, assistant professor of history, writes in Sunday’s Boston Globe Magazine (March 3, 2013) that when kids contribute around the house, great things can happen. Not only does the cleaning get done but they develop a sense of accomplishment that has lasting effects. Here’s the start of Howard’s article, entitled, “Why Your Children Should Do Their Chores”:

“EVERY YEAR, busloads of schoolchildren take field trips to the mills at Lowell National Historical Park. While chaperone mothers tote tankards of iced coffee and admire the charming red-brick factories that date from the 1820s, students examine spinning and weaving machines operated by ‘mill girls’ as young as 10 and envision the roar and sweat of fiber-saturated rooms in full production. Properly horrified, young visitors draw the conclusion that only mean, bad people make children work. Then they retreat to their own world of school and play . . . read more.”